Nicky Carligeanu (1964 – ) is co-winner of the Susan and David Hirsch 1st Prize of the Debussy Trio Music Foundation’s 2004 Biennial International Composition Competition. His Rondo can be heard on the recording of the The Debussy Trio’s Ahead (Klavier).

Born in Romania he emigrated with his wife and two daughters in 2000 to Montreal, Canada, where he enrolled in Musical Studies at Concordia University. There he developed a deep interest in the Eastern European music of Enescu and Bartok, the Western music of Messiaen, the Beatles, and Indian tradition. Before leaving Romania he worked as a piano accompanist, freelance keyboardist, radio and TV music editor, and sound editor.

“RONDO has its roots in my admiration for Romanian musical folklore, for Bartok’s highly controlled energy, and for jazz harmony. The formal unity of the piece is provided by the refrain, which keeps coming back after intermediary episodes. The distribution of the dynamic accents has the important role of rhythmically carving out the 4/4 meter of the piece, like chisel strikes on a cube, in order to obtain an asymmetrical balance. I used to read Plato’s Dialogues, and in a way I have tried to bring a touch of that spirit to the music.” – N. Carligeanu.

Nicky Carligeanu (1964 – ) is co-winner of the Susan and David Hirsch 1st Prize of the Debussy Trio Music Foundation’s 2004 Biennial International Composition Competition. His Rondo can be heard on the recording of the The Debussy Trio’s Ahead (Klavier).

Born in Romania he emigrated with his wife and two daughters in 2000 to Montreal, Canada, where he enrolled in Musical Studies at Concordia University. There he developed a deep interest in the Eastern European music of Enescu and Bartok, the Western music of Messiaen, the Beatles, and Indian tradition. Before leaving Romania he worked as a piano accompanist, freelance keyboardist, radio and TV music editor, and sound editor.

“RONDO has its roots in my admiration for Romanian musical folklore, for Bartok’s highly controlled energy, and for jazz harmony. The formal unity of the piece is provided by the refrain, which keeps coming back after intermediary episodes. The distribution of the dynamic accents has the important role of rhythmically carving out the 4/4 meter of the piece, like chisel strikes on a cube, in order to obtain an asymmetrical balance. I used to read Plato’s Dialogues, and in a way I have tried to bring a touch of that spirit to the music.” – N. Carligeanu.

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